Building an Engine Wiring Harness

23 Building Engine Wiring Harnessfire Wrap 3000
01 Building Engine Wiring Harness

Whether you need to customize your engine wiring harness or just want to improve its appearance, we offer an alternative to purchasing expensive aftermarket harnesses. Keep in mind that this is not a definitive guide on building wiring harnesses; rather, we show you some basic steps on how to properly restore/clean up your engine wire harness using a number of DEI products.

If you’ve noticed by now, the OE harness has been sheathed using electrical tape and plastic loom. Yes, it’s cost effective on their part, but in all honesty, it doesn’t look good. The factory-style split loom is an eye sore with its bulky appearance while electrical tape over time will “weep” adhesive and peel off, leaving a sticky residue that’s a nuisance to remove.

The most important thing to consider before tackling this particular DIY project is deciding if this is a full-blown rewire job or a simple clean up. The more time-consuming wiring jobs will take a few days to a week to complete, so if this is your daily driver plan accordingly. Upon spending some time researching different methods of making wiring harnesses more clean and subtle, we decided to loom the harness entirely in heat-shrink tubing (no seams). We began by spending some quality time peeling off about a roll of old, greasy sticky, electrical insulation tape from our Subaru STI engine harness.

  • 02 Building Engine Wiring Harness
  • 03 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Products
  • 04 Building Engine Wiring Harness Wiring

Wiring Harness Rebuild

06 Building Engine Wiring Harness Plug
05 Building Engine Wiring Harness Wiring Diagram

It’s important to use the proper tools: a good set of wire strippers and cutters, a soldering iron, a heat gun, shrink wrap, pick tools, and self-vulcanizing tape. Always keep an OE service manual handy to access the wiring diagrams for your vehicle’s exact year and model/sub-model due to wiring differences between models. Repair any frayed wires prior to rewrapping.

Document the current wiring/clips and routing with detailed pictures prior to de-pinning the harness. If necessary use masking tape and/or zip tie to separate the wires and label each connection prior to taking photos for future reference to keep track of your progress. Most importantly, don’t begin by simply tearing apart your engine harness! Carefully plan your route of attack while sorting through the tangled wires. Properly measure each wire length as well as how they are routed to ensure your finished harness will install properly without any issues.

07 Building Engine Wiring Harness Wiring

Heat shrink offers a clean, no seam look, and it will never peel off or break. The DEI heat-shrink tubing is mil-spec grade, withstands up to 275 degrees F of direct heat, and is flame retardant. This meets or exceeds the corrugated looming that you typically see on engine harnesses.

  • 08 Building Engine Wiring Harness Wiring
  • 09 Building Engine Wiring Harness Wiring Pick Tools
  • 10 Building Engine Wiring Harness Wiring Shrink Tubing

DEI Hi-Temp Shrink Tubes

DEI Hi-Temp Shrink Tubes can be used to insulate wires, wire splicing, connections, and terminals and meets the material functional properties of mil-spec DTL-23053/5C. Professional-grade mil-spec flexible polyolefin tubing provides excellent electrical insulation, protection from dirt, dust, solvents, and foreign materials as well as providing strain relief. With a 3:1 shrink ratio and temp resistant from -67 degrees F to 275 degrees F, DEI shrink tubes are an alternative to corrugated plastic, which over time will cause “chaffing” of wires inside the conduit. It is best to have your wires tightly wrapped with heat shrink so they do not rub against each other. A simple trick to speed up the process is to use a wire secured to tape holding the main wires to pull through the heat-shrink tubes.

  • 11 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Hi Temp Shrink Tube
  • 12 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Hi Temp Shrink Tube
  • 13 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Hi Temp Shrink Tube

DEI Fire Tape

14 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Fire Tape

Fire Tape is a nonadhesive silicone rubber tape that is self-bonding, self-curing, and forms a permanent watertight barrier that withstands 475 degrees F direct continuous heat. We like the fact that you’re not left with a sticky residue when unsheathing the wires. Combined with the DEI Fire Sleeve or hose protective sleeve products is an excellent insulating alternative to vinyl tapes and can be used to wrap wiring harnesses and cover and protect wire splices. Problematic portions of the harness, such as the firewall plugs that are too large to fit heat-shrink sheathing over the wires have the option of being rewrapped in loom/tape or nonadhesive silicone rubber tape as we used in the photo at the left.

  • 15 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Fire Tape
  • 16 Building Engine Wiring Harness Before DEI Fire Tape

    Before
  • 17 Building Engine Wiring Harness Before After DEI Fire Tape

    After using DEI heat shrink and Fire Tape.

DEI Fire Sleeve

19 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Fire Sleeve
18 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Fire Sleeve

Constructed from a high-temperature-resistant braided glass material, woven into a sleeve and heavily coated with 100 percent iron oxide silicone rubber, Fire Sleeve provides the ultimate in heat insulation and protection from direct heat up to 500 degrees F continuous/2,000 degrees F intermittent heat. The fire sleeve helps to insulate wiring, hoses, oil/brake/transmission lines and can also be used for bundling and protecting hoses, electrical wiring, and more. To dispel heat, we wrapped the ignition coil wires with DEI Fire sleeve, which happens to sit adjacent to the turbo up-pipe.

  • 20 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Fire Sleeve
  • 21 Building Engine Wiring Harness DEI Fire Sleeve
  • 22 Building Engine Wiring Harness Ignition Coil Iring

Fire Wrap 3000

23 Building Engine Wiring Harnessfire Wrap 3000

Constructed from the same material as Fire Sleeve but with the convenience of a hook and loop edge closure design. Simply wrap Fire Wrap 3000 around wires, cables, or hoses without the need of disconnecting. We plan to cover the larger harnesses in the direct path of the turbo and downpipe once our newly rebuilt engine has been installed.

Using a labeler can help identify plugs when installing them on your engine. You can take it one step further and use clear heat shrink to protect the labels.

We think the results are pretty nice and make for a really clean look, but you can be the judge.

source: importtuner

Global Time Attack at Road Atlanta

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

Road Atlanta and Global Time Attack are a match made in heaven. If you combine a 2.54 mile road course that rolls through the green hills of Georgia with an open rule set where maximum speed and minimum lap times are all that matters, you’re bound to have an incredible event.

Thanks to GTA series sponsors like Continental Tire, Whiteline Suspension, Garrett Turbo, Spec Clutch and Meister Watches, the battle for Road Atlanta certainly did not disappoint, with new competitors in the mix, newly set fastest lap records, and even big crashes!

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution 7 Evo7 Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

From the perspective of Professional Awesome Racing, Road Atlanta was a shakedown and tuneup for the heavily revised 2001 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VII. Gone were the Active Center Differential and Super Active Yaw Control rear differential, replaced with mechanical differentials front, center and rear.

Having switched from Street Tire to Limited class at the Global Time Attack finale in November 2012, it was also a time to learn the nuances of driving differences of the Hankook Ventus TD in comparison to the Ventus RS-3.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution 7 Evo7 Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

Unfortunately, Day 1 proved to be a challenge from start to finish. Chasing issues of excessive oil consumption, the car would not run consistently enough to put together one flying lap. Having a never-say-die attitude, team members Grant Davis, Mike Lewin and Jordan Gilsinger embarked on a parts search throughout the greater Atlanta area, devising a solution that proved to work extremely well by the end of the day.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Tony Szirka Unlimited Class Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution Jason Dienhart Kyle Lewis

With the problem solved, the crew proceeded to help fellow competitor, Tony Szirka, replace a transmission in his Unlimited Class Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Tony Szirka Unlimited Class Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution Jason Dienhart

Szirka and Professional Awesome have a long history of working together under the most adverse circumstances to fix record breaking cars at the last possible moment!

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution 7 Evo7 Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

A threat of rain was in the forecast for the second day of competition, but feeling confident that all major issues had been addressed, Professional Awesome hit the track hard looking to gain lost time from the previous day.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution 7 Evo7 Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

The car performed flawlessly in the first sessions of the day, and I with became even more comfortable with the vehicle changes as the day progressed. Minor tire pressure and alignment changes were all that was needed to maximize grip and to dial in the balance for optimal performance, though a new issue had peaked its head.

The car was running perfectly, but low on boost at only 22psi. The car had already set the new limited record with a time of 1:31.717, but quick adjustments were made to the tune to see if more power could be coaxed from the Evolution. Based on the previous year’s data, the team believed a 1:29.xxx  lap was possible and expectations were high for the fifth session.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution 7 Evo7 CRASH Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart Kyle Lewis

The fifth session proved to be the final session of our 2001 Evolution’s life.

Following another 1:31 second lap, I entered turn 1 and lost control of the car after an outside tire dipped into the Georgia clay. A hard crash ensued, but luckily I walked away with only minor bruising and a good headache.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

Following the crash, the final session ran and everyone prepared for the awards ceremony.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

At the podium ceremony, champagne was sprayed, big checks collected and fast lap Meister watches given to competitors.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

Much to the surprise of Professional Awesome, new Limited Front Wheel Drive record holder Doug Wind (left) gave his event winnings to the team to help the rebuilding process and Tony Szirka (right) followed suit, also donating his winnings.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

It was an incredible ending to an incredible event which saw competitors from the West Coast, East Coast and everywhere in-between.

New lap records were set in Street Rear Wheel Drive, Front Wheel Drive, Limited All Wheel Drive and Limited Front Wheel Drive which will give new goals for 2014 competitors to strive for.

Global Time Attack Road Atlanta GTA Professional Awesome Racing Dan O'Donnell Jason Dienhart

At the end of the day, it was amazing to see how tightly knit the time attack community is, helping out fellow competitors from start to finish! We look forward to seeing what will happen in November at the Global Time Attack Finale in Central California’s Buttonwillow Raceway on November 15, 2013.

MotorMavens has thousands more photos from GTA Road Atlanta! Stay tuned to MotorMavens for the next GTA photo update!

:: Dan O’Donnell

5 Ways To Make Your Subaru Impreza STi Better

Subaru-Impreza-STi-Tuning

Subaru’s legendary Classic Impreza STi has been at the top of the tuning scene for a long time, and rightly so. Here’s how you can build your very own 400bhp daily driver

1. STYLING
True Impreza fans tend to shy away from overly-styled rides, and for good reason – there’s no need to change what’s already a superb-looking car. Instead, we’d recommend that unless you’re the proud owner of a later-spec model, you upgrade your vehicle to a V5 (Version 5) or V6 spec. Between 1996 and 1997 the Classic was face-lifted, so owners of early models often upgrade their cars to match the later iterations. Deeper front grilles, crystal headlights and indicators and higher-level rear spoilers are all common but great-looking mods. Consider a P1 front splitter if you want to create an aggressive-looking front-end, or look at some of the composite splitters and spoilers from Seibon if you’re more of a carbon junkie. Just bear in mind the standard STi aluminium bonnet is lighter than most carbon items! The car pictured has a front-mounted intercooler, so the bonnet scoop has been reversed to dissipate heat, rather than suck air in to the intercooler.

 

 

2. ENGINE TUNING
The EJ20 2.0ltr unit in the STi is a great base for further tuning and has proven itself at the highest levels of motorsport over the years. In terms of building a capable daily driver, there’s no real benefit to be had from upgrading the bottom end at this sort of power level – it comes with forged internals as standard, a higher rev limit than the UK models and will be happy kicking out 400bhp if it’s mapped properly. We’d advise you to fit a higher-flowing RCM oil pump as your first priority, as this is a part that commonly leads to engine failure. To achieve 400bhp, you should be looking at upgrading to a TD05-20G, MD321H or GT2871r turbo, all of which are capable of doing the desired figures. On top of that, you’ll also be looking at bigger injectors, an upgraded fuel pump, adjustable fuel pressure regulator, front-mounted intercooler, tubular headers and a full decat exhaust system from the likes of Hayward & Scott, Scoobysport, HKS or RCM. There are various ECUs and boost controllers on the market, but we’d advise that you take it to a mapping specialist such as Zen Performance to get the car dialled in. The clutch will also need upgrading to handle the power, so check out items from Exedy or OS Giken. Elsewhere, it’s worth fitting a lightweight flywheel while you’re there!

 

3. INTERIOR
As with the exterior, there’s no real benefit in making drastic changes to the interior if your car is used daily, but it’s worth considering upgrading to match the spec of the later model Imprezas. Pre-1997 Classics came with a different dash to later cars, but the main change we’d make is to fit some late-model STi seats. It’s worth fitting some aftermarket gauges to keep an eye on the important bits – in particular oil pressure and temperature, and water temperature. There are various triple-gauge mounting kits available for the centre of the dash, which enable you to fit the gauges of your choice. A KnockLink meter is another Impreza favourite worth considering to monitor for harmful detonation. Aside from that – fit a tidy double DIN headunit and some upgraded component speakers and you’ve done all you need to do.

4. SUSPENSION & HANDLING 

There are a plethora of suspension upgrade choices available for the Classic, designed for anything from the daily commuter right through to the dedicated track car. But for a daily-driven car that needs to retain some degree of comfort, we’d recommend Tein’s Type Flex coilovers with adjustable top mounts. They provide a firm but supple ride and create a car that can be driven in the real world, especially where your Impreza excels – on B-roads and country lanes. If you’re looking at doing the occasional trackday in addition, consider a slightly firmer set-up from the likes of AST, or for the ultimate in WRC-derived suspension porn, Exe-tc is the way forward. But expect to pay for it! It’s also worth looking into the range of Whiteline suspension components you can buy for your Classic – anything from uprated anti-roll bars through to anti-lift kits, heavy duty drop links and bump-steer kits. These elements will further enhance the suspension set- up of your car, but wouldn’t be absolutely critical on a daily driver.

 

5. WHEELS & BRAKES
It’s generally accepted that on a Classic, a 17in wheel is the limit if you want to retain the car’s nimble characteristics and great point-to-point abilities. If you choose 17in rims with good clearance, you’ll have space to upgrade to later-model Brembo four-pots from a newer Impreza, or a 330mm AP six-pot kit, which will provide you with eyeball-wrenching stopping power. We’d recommend a super- lightweight classy wheel, such as OZ Ultraleggeras.

 

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source: fastcar.co.uk

A GLIMPSE OF THE NEW WRX?

For a few years now, we’ve all been wondering what the future holds for the Subaru WRX. If these leaked photos are legit, you are looking at Subaru’s new WRX Concept.

While nothing is confirmed, Subaru has announced it will be revealing a “performance concept” at the upcoming New York Auto Show. This appears to be right on the money.

And while it is just a concept, the styling suggests a dramatic departure from the conservative look of the standard Impreza. It’s also immediately recognizable as a WRX.

No official info has been published about the next WRX, but rumor has it the car will make somewhere in the range 300 horsepower and may even have an electric turbo.

Whatever the case, we’ll certainly know more once the show opens.

For now – what do you think of the WRX Concept?

 

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source: speedhunters.com

2013 Mitsubishi 311RS Evo X

By and large, Mitsubishi isn’t the first automaker you think of when you’re thinking of a high-powered sports car. But they do have one model that’s almost always in the discussion: the Lancer Evolution.

Now on its 10th iteration – or “X,” as the Japanese automaker prefers to call it – the Evo has always been one of the most popular models in Mitsubishi’s lineup, so much so that circuit racer, Ryan Gates, decided to build an ultra-limited edition model of the Evo X.

He calls it the 311RS and it has a load of aftermarket goodies in it, something Evo X fans will come to appreciate.

Gates only has 11 models of the 311RS at his disposal with one already headed to the White Bear Mitsubishi dealership in White Bear Lake, MN. Should you be interested in taking a good look at the car, you can also go to the 2013 Minneapolis Auto Show where the car will be prominently displayed.

Exterior

The Mitsubishi 311RS Evo X doesn’t look too different from the “standard” Evo X, which is a good thing because the Evo X looks pretty sweet in its own right. Having said that, there are some add-ons installed, including a JDP front lip that not only makes for a cleaner-looking body, but also provides aerodynamic enhancements to the car. Additionally, a carbon-fiber Voltex rear wing was also installed, replacing the OEM version and provides the kind of aero balance that the 311RS needs to keep itself coordinated.

The 311RS also gets a new livery, one designed by Jon Sibal, with a simplicity that’s been designed to keep the focus on the car’s performance. Rounding out the exterior modifications is a set of 18-inch Volk CE28 wheels wrapped in Nitto NT05 tires.

 

Interior

Not a whole lot of modifications on this end, except for the use of Etnies E-suede, which is supposedly three times more durable than traditional suede.

Engine

For the seeming lack of overwhelming upgrades done on the Evo X’s exterior and interior, Ryan Gates did do some wonders on the car’s performance credentials, thanks to a number of AMS components, including a new intake that increases air flow to the turbocharger for increased horsepower. The program also has lightweight, polished-aluminum intercooler piping that provides less turbulent and freer-flowing air flow for maximum efficiency.

A new intercooler, a wide-mouth downpipe, a new cat pipe, and a new racing series cat-back exhaust system were also installed.

Finally, an engine tune was also made to the Evo X, increasing the output of the car to 353 horsepower and 359 pound-feet of torque.

Suspension

With an engine tune as extensive as the one done on the 311RS Evo X, Gates also took up the task of improving the car’s suspension and he certainly spared no expense putting in the best components. One of the items is the RS1 suspension from JRZ, whose valving was designed to be adjusted from street comfort to racing damping characteristics in seconds. In addition, the kit also comes with customized spring rates and adjustment range. Aircraft aluminum suspension top mounts from – again – JRZ were also used to transmit suspension loads directly to the chassis, giving unparalleled response and driver feel.

Likewise, Gates also went about the business of improving the braking dynamics of the Evo X, doing so by replacing the OEM models with Girodisc two-piece rotors that not only reduce unsprung and overall vehicle weight but also increases the ventilation and cooling capacity of the brake discs, while retaining its original dimensions. Stainless lines, heat shield and new brake pads were also installed, rounding out the dynamic braking package befitting a car of the Evo X’s stature.

Pricing

Reportedly, only 11 models of the 311RS Evo X will go on sale, each costing $49,000.

Competition

The ultra-limited status of the 311RS Evo X makes it a must-have for any fan of Mitsubishi’s rowdy sports car. But in the event that you’re in the market for options, Subaru’s Impreza WRX STI is a pretty good alternative. Performance numbers certainly point to the side of the 311RS Evo X but the good thing about the Impreza WRX STI is that it’s completely aftermarket worthy. What that means is that even if you do get a stock Impreza, there are plenty of options moving forward on how you can exceed the technical upgrades done on the 311RS Evo X.

 

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source : topspeed.com