THE WEKFEST LA SPOTLIGHT-O-RAMA

Now that I’ve given you guys a broad look at Wekfest LA 2013, it’s time to close out my coverage with a Spotlight-o-Rama featuring some of the most interesting cars from the show. The result of my hunt has brought a mix of clean street cars, mad stance machines and some cool engine swaps. Let’s begin with the RHD EG Civic pictured above.

With so many high quality Honda builds appearing at events like Wekfest, it can be hard find the cars that really stand out. But there was just something about this particular Civic that I really liked.

The car was in immaculate condition inside and out, and the right-hand-drive cockpit was set off with with a few cool details like a wood-rimmed Nardi steering wheel. I also like the use of the factory seats rather than aftermarket buckets. How can you not like those cool 1990s seat patterns?

The wheels on the EG were also quite special: 16-inch Desmond Regamaster Evos that have been custom-widened into some very aggressive sizes.

All in all, this Civic is a perfect example of the extreme attention to detail you find on so many cars at Wekfest. It was certainly one of my favorite Hondas of the day.

We’ll be sticking with the Honda theme for the next car – a CE1 Accord Wagon from the City Stars Crew. I might be slightly biased because I used to own one of these things, but the I absolutely love the long-roof version of the Accord.

Before I continue on with the Spotlight, just a little piece of trivia on this generation of Accord Wagon. Did you know that even the Japanese market versions of these car were actually assembled in Ohio before being exported to Japan and labeled as the ‘US Wagon’?

Anyway, this particular wagon was really built as a perfect cruiser. A set of old school Volk Racing mesh wheels are a fine choice to go with the 1990s style – although the fitment and stance are something that’s a little more contemporary.

Inside, a simple leather interior was complemented by a few small bits like another wood Nardi wheel and a classic bubble shift knob with Crown Royal boot.

Good style, tons of room for passengers or parts hauling, and bulletproof Honda reliability – it’s not hard to see why the Accord Wagon makes such a good daily driver. I’d love to have another someday.

I know some of you guys have expressed concern over the lack of Toyota MR2s on Speedhunters, so when I saw this Nevada-based SW20 I knew it was the perfect chance to do something about that.

Then again, the car was cool enough on its own merits to warrant a spotlight. In my eye this example seemed to have the perfect balance of aesthetic and performance modifications.

It was also in fantastic cosmetic shape, as evidenced by this view of the cockpit.

As for wheels. the car was equipped with a set of staggered Work Emotion XD9s – a perfect match for the subtle body upgrades and hunkered-down stance.

There you have it – some much needed Speedhunters MR2 love. I suppose the fact that an awesome mid-engined turbo sports car is somewhat ‘overlooked’ really shows just how good Toyota was back in the ’90s.

Next up, we have a car that just might incite some colorful conversation in the comments section. In fact, it almost seems like that may have been the intention with this build.

And whether you love it or hate it, the BMW Z4 from the Low ‘N Slow Crew certainly stops people in its tracks. If there was a negative camber award at Wekfest, this car would have taken it home.

I do have to say that the sweeping body lines of the Z4 are actually a pretty good match for this sort of cartoonish ride height and wheel fitment.

Just look at the way the fenders literally sit on top of the Work Schwert SC2 wheels. Whoa.

Before you go nuts over the nonfunctional suspension setup remember that the car does have “Low ‘N Slow” written down the side of it after all.

Moving in another direction now, we have a car that was clearly built for a little more than just looking pretty on the grass. From a distance it looks like a nice clean example of a first generation RX-7…

… but then you look under the hood and see that the car is powered not by a rotary, but a Honda F20C from an S2000.

To be honest, I’d never really thought about how good of a combination the SA22C and a high revving VTEC powerplant would be. After seeing this car, it all makes sense.

Besides the requisite S2000 instrument cluster, I also really liked how the owner fitted a vintage Mugen steering wheel – just to further throw people off when they peek inside.

So yes, contrary to the beliefs of some commenters there were plenty of cars at Wekfest that were about more than just aesthetics.

Last but not least we have one of the coolest and most unique cars in the entire show. Actually, it’s not even a car but a first generation Honda Odyssey built by Fast Eddie’s Racing.

From certain angles the van looks like your typical cruiser, but the looks are really just scratching the surface of what this minivan is all about.

Sure, there are cool style details like a set of 1990s-era Racing Hart wheels, but you have to look at the engine bay to really see where the magic is.

Under the hood, you’ll find a Honda H22 swap – but not just any H22. This motor has a totally trick reverse head setup based on the Honda Accord touring cars of the 1990s. The front-facing individual throttle bodies really make for a strange response when peo0ple walk by.

So there you have it – a little sampling of the kind of machines found at Wekfest LA. Some were built to go fast, some were built raise eyebrows and some were built to do both.

 

Mike Garrett

 

 

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source: speedhunters
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1993 Honda Civic CX – Hard White

To be completely honest with you, there isn’t very much we know about the owner of this Championship White 1993 Civic CX. We know that his name is Joshua Antolin and he hails from the great state of Hawaii-and that’s about it. Instead of going the traditional route of telling you a story behind an enthusiast’s build, we’re going to try something a little different. Let’s break the “fourth wall”, so to speak, for a different twist on what you’re used to reading. If you don’t know what the hell the “fourth wall” is, try to remember an episode of Saved by the Bell when Zach Morris freezes time, turns to the audience and speaks directly to them-that’s what’s considered “breaking the fourth wall”. (Still clueless? Clearly you’re too young to know what SBTB or who Kelly Kapowski is.) What I’m trying to do today is something similar-sort of. Breaking the fourth wall usually means that you’re being pulled out of an imaginary scenario but in the world of automotive publication, what you’re seeing and reading is very real.

In the years that I’ve been writing for Super Street, we’ve seen it all; all types of cars, different styles of tuning and getting to know each personality that makes up our crazy world. How these features come together before they hit print is pretty predictable. We see a car, find the owner, arrange for the car to be shot and have them fill out various forms, one of them being the ‘tech sheet’. These tech sheets open the lines of communication between the owner and the writers for the magazine, and usually includes every important piece of info you’ll need, from knowing which parts were used, right up to the entire back story on how the car came together. Some tech sheets are filled out in an incredibly detailed fashion, with every important aspect of the build documented, but sometimes you get little to no information at all, with the questions we ask responded to in one or two words. In those instances, it is our job to get in touch with them to see if they can give us some sort of story about their build. If for whatever reason we can’t get a hold of the owner, we then have to proceed to use the power of the worldwide web to dig up any information we can on the owner and their car-(begin sarcasm) the part we love most (end sarcasm).

If Joshua was planning on living off the grid, he’s done an incredible job of it because there is little to no information on his Civic. He doesn’t peruse any internet forums, doesn’t have a cool internet nickname that people would immediately recognize, and (gasp) the guy is non-existent on any social media outlet. A decade ago, it would be considered “normal” but in the information-age, the guy is practically a ghost. The age-old phone call and email were also extended but with no response. We noticed his car was spotlighted one other time on a popular car website but after a thorough reading, they, too, weren’t able to squeeze a whole lot of information out of the guy. To offer you a better understanding, one of the main questions on the tech sheet was “Why did you build this vehicle?” Joshua’s response was simply, “To be cool.” We agree that his Civic is indeed cool but it would have been great had he tossed us that proverbial bone.

The only other tidbit of info is that he’s from Hawaii, and let’s not kid ourselves, you’ve read plenty features about vehicle builds from Hawaii. Let’s not forget the cliché play on words to try to manipulate something Hawaiian into the opening title. All you need to know about Hawaii is that they produce some great cars and that they’ve been doing so for years now. Some of the most inspirational and memorable Hondas from the past have been from the 808. The island may be small but buried in all that beautiful scenery are some true gems-you just have to find them.

Devoid of any sort of backstory, all we are left with are visual depictions of a story left untold. The Civic itself is a very well-executed build that represents the clean and simple style that Hawaiian enthusiasts have come to be known for. You’ll rarely find extensive race-bred Hondas there because it’s not what they are about. Hondas assembled on the island are built to be clean street cruisers and Joshua’s is just that. Outside, the entire 19 year-old chassis has been massaged, door dings and minor damage repaired before being sprayed the ever-classic Honda Championship White. A BackYard Special front lip and rear duckbill spoiler serve as the only aftermarket additions to the body while OEM J-spec lighting all-around give it some Japanese chic. Both front and rear fenders have been significantly altered to house an aggressive set of staggered 16×8/9.5-inch JLine wheels. Fitting the wheels required some trickery and a lot of help from negative camber adjustments. Providing the appropriate ride height is essential to pulling of this type of wheel fitment so Function & Form was called upon for their Type 2 adjustable dampers.

As stated, an everyday street Honda in Hawaii is rarely built with a full track car appeal in mind, it just has to function and look good doing so. Joshua’s engine bay reflects that. Under the hood, you won’t find any forced induction components or custom oil catch cans and breathers. There isn’t anything but the bare necessities like your typical air intake, header, and exhaust. The rest has been stripped down and the only major addition other than the 2000 ITR motor is negative space. Helping to free this space is a custom radiator that hides beneath the core support. On the firewall, the factory brake booster has been eliminated and mounted in its place is a Wilwood brake master cylinder. The bay was then shaved smooth and color-matched to the rest of the shell. All electrical connections deemed unnecessary are disregarded by utilizing a Rywire engine harness. The cockpit of this CX hatchback mirrors the exterior and engine bay’s minimalism. Besides the MOMO steering wheel and NEXT Miracle X bar, there isn’t much to go nuts about. A near complete JDM SiR interior has been supplemented but only the Honda-lover with a keen eye would catch that.

While the info for Josh’s Civic is sparse, perhaps this story doesn’t need to be about a car that’s been stuffed to the brim with as many parts as a given tech sheet can handle. Its overall simplicity speaks volumes on its own. I’d drop another random Saved By the Bell reference but my sleep deprivation is starting to kick in; I’d better end it here.

Tuning Menu

1993 Honda Civic CX

Owner Joshua Antolin

Hometown Honolulu, HI

Occupation Painter

Engine 2000 Honda 1.8L B18C5; Innovative engine mounts; Skunk2 Pro Series intake manifold; AEM fuel rail; PLM header; Password:JDM dry carbon fiber Power Chamber intake; All-In Fab radiator, coolant lines; shaved engine bay; Rywire engine harness; Odyssey battery

Drivetrain Honda S80 manual transmission; Exedy clutch

Engine Management Chipped P28 ECU

Footwork & Chassis Function & Form Type 2 coilovers; Wicked Tuning front camber plates; Blox rear camber plates; Function7 rear lower control arms; ASR subframe brace; NEXT Miracle X bar

Brakes Chasebays brake line tuck; OEM 2000 Civic Si brake proportioning valve; Wilwood brake master cylinder, cluster master cylinder reservoir

Wheels & Tires 16×8″ +5/16×9 +0 JLine SDMSL2; 205/40R16 Falken Ziex 912; Blox lug nuts

Exterior PPG Championship White paint; BackYard Special front lip, rear spoiler; Vision TC side mirrors; JDM OEM window visors, headlights, corner lights, taillights; rolled and pulled front/rear fenders

Interior JDM EG6 SiR front seats, rear seats, interior panels, instrument cluster; MOMO steering wheel; JDM OEM Gathers head unit

Thanks You New City Fender, Jake, Chang, Marc, Dexter, Alex, John, Guillermo, Roger, uncle Herbert, and my dad